Keeping Your Toothbrush (and Mouth) Free from Harmful Bacteria

Keeping Your Toothbrush (and Mouth) Free from Harmful Bacteria

teeth cleaning CypressYour mouth is naturally full of bacteria; by following a thorough regimen designed to protect your teeth and gums, you should be able to keep your mouth as healthy as possible. Brushing and flossing as directed are the best methods of teeth cleaning coupled with visits to your dentist every six months.

The correct tools are a great place to start. An electronic toothbrush allows the patient to clean their teeth using the appropriate amount of pressure; a timer signals when the patient has brushed for the recommended two minutes. If a manual toothbrush is employed, a soft bristle variety is the best choice.

A fluoridated toothpaste or gel should be used. Depending on the oral health of the patient, additional help in the form of fluoridated or anti-bacterial rinses may be recommended by your dentist.

The patient should brush at least twice daily (morning and night). Flossing once daily to remove food debris your toothbrush missed should also be part of your daily oral maintenance program.

Failure to provide the care needed to limit harmful bacteria can lead to both short term problems like decay to long term issues like gum disease. Once a patient has been diagnosed with periodontal disease, even though the disease may not be active, you may still be prone to recurrence.

Since your toothbrush is an integral tool in your oral health, you and your family should be aware of the things that can promote bacterial growth. A wet toothbrush should never be stored in an enclosed case; contact between other family member toothbrushes should never be allowed.

Since most people brush in the bathroom, are you aware that every time the toilet is flushed water and waste particles are released in the area nearby? Keep that in mind when storing your toothbrush.

Replacing your toothbrush on a regular basis is important – while everyone’s needs are different, a new brush every three months is a good place to start. If illness has occurred, you need to either replace or disinfect your toothbrush.

Links between oral and overall health provide another reason to be diligent about taking care of your teeth, gums, and mouth. Be mindful of daily care by brushing and flossing using clean and up to date tools; and make sure you see your dentist every six months for cleaning and exam.

If it’s time to schedule your next visit, contact the office of Dr. Lori Logan today.

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